Vertical transformations in GIS

You know those moments where you are sat in a pub, the office or at a friends house and you say something, then suddenly wonder why you haven’t thought of it before?….I had that very issue in the Brew Dog pub near Spitalfields in London, UK a couple of weeks ago. You see, I was discussing the use of web mapping in 3D and writing a specification for the data being hosted and then it came out….

“I wonder if 3D GIS systems use 3D transformations”…...

Before I even finished the sentence I was starting to get palpitations at the thought of throwing all my hard work over the last few months away. Okay, so maybe that is a bit of an exaggeration. I do take into consideration the vertical transformation when working between data and am a bit of a tide datum nerd, though the question was now out there….

3D GIS…a quick reminder

First, let me address the “3D GIS” elephant in the room. Is there such a thing? My current stance is yes. Having used many different GIS over the last few years, I would say that many would tell you that they are, but they would almost all be wrong. Take for example CesiumJS, it is a fantastic 3D webgl viewer but can you edit the data on screen? Can you transform data between coordinate systems? (The answer you are looking for is no) Other systems which I have discounted are QGIS, MapInfo, CADCorp, Google Earth, ArcScene, GRASS, OpenGIS and also AutoCAD Map¹, purely due to them not having the capability of showing multiple coordinate system 3D data on a globe. Yes, I understand that you can pre-process the data so that it is all in the same coordinate system and then process the datum so that it is all consistent, but NOT on the fly.

There is only one “3D GIS” at the moment, the much overlooked ESRI ArcGIS Pro.

flight-paths-for-wind-farm-analysis

Compared to the 3D capabilities of the other GIS, asking it to handle vertical transformations on the globe as well as the most up to date horizontal transformations would be a bit of an ask, but you know what?…..It is pretty good…..

Disclaimer time, I am currently running the Beta version of ArcGIS Pro 1.4, though I am told it shouldn’t matter, also I have been talking with a few of the developers on functionality but this is a 3D GIS which is out on the shelves now and works. For the OCD spatial nerd, it ticks the boxes, I can use the provided international transformations or I can create my own, though more importantly, I can work with my survey (lidar) data alongside my topographic data, which is alongside my hydrographic data- so I can easily QA the data and share the results quickly.

For the n00bs, why do you need vertical transformations?

Simply put, a horizontal datum is a reference system for specifying positions on the Earth’s surface, so that the coordinate system is of uniform measure, likewise, a vertical datum is a reference to the height of the surface. All simple at the moment….a datum is based on an ellipsoid/spheroid (these geo people can’t decide what shape round they want to call it, so interchange all the time) Each ellipsoid is the best approximation of the Earths surface at any point on the Earth, you may have seen “Clarke 1866, GRS80 or WGS84” in the coordinate information of your data

clarke1866_wgs84_grs80

So you can start to see, just transforming your 3D data from one coordinate system to another isn’t quite so simple as the 2D Helmert you’ve been using. Relax, I’m not going to now go into a geoids and equipotential surfaces (unless you want me to) I am merely pointing out that we need vertical transformations in out lives, otherwise, when you transform your beautiful 3D village model from WGS84 to British National Grid, you will be wondering why it is floating in the air.

This might not matter much to the casual 3D GIS dabbler, as most of the work may be small and the effects won’t be large enough to be noticeable, though when it gets to city size, you will certainly start seeing issues with the buildings at the periphery not sitting right (when you edit the centre to sit right).

In summary

Since joining Garsdale Design in January, I have been doing a LOT of 3D GIS and putting my geodetic knowledge to ensuring things are correct. In the last 6 months I have been having to use ArcGIS Pro more and more, partly due to functionality and partly due to data formats which clients use. My opinion is that this software is becoming the one stop shop for 3D GIS and it is capable of supporting the whole project lifecycle of the project….it could turn out to be the BIM solution that everyone has overlooked. More importantly though, is that ESRI have done their homework and are supporting vertical datum transformations….okay, there are a few missing here and there BUT the list is growing and they are putting these vertical transformations into the geoprocessing tools of ArcGIS Desktop too.

verticaltransforms
Screenshot of (a small portion of) the vertical transformation list

If you know of another 3D GIS, please let me know, as I’d be eager to try it. Please feel free to either contact me direct or through comment below.

Using 3D Web Mapping to Model Offshore Archaeology

Ever since I started working in the renewables industry on offshore wind farms over 8yrs ago and had to analyse shipwrecks, I thought about how much more interactive and informative shipwreck analysis would be in 3D. There are many companies out there at the moment who produce the most amazing visualisations, where is the ability to move along a fixed track to view a 2.5D wreck but there is no ability to relate it to anything, no context and normally the cost is extremely high when the data captured is normally geospatial and used within a GIS such as QGIS, ArcGIS or Fledemaus.

Here is an example of the amazing model of the James Eagen Layne created by Fourth Element and the model of the Markgraf Shipwreck by Scapa Flow Wrecks

Please don’t get me wrong, I admire these models and they provide detail and information that would be almost impossible to render in a GIS web map without some serious development and a lot of modelling but technology has progressed. Five years ago I would have said that creating an offshore 3D web map was the thing of dreams, whereas today it is a few clicks of the mouse. Using ESRI software, I was able to combine both terrain and bathymetry, adjust for tide datum differences, import a 3D model and then add links and images to the web map (called a ‘scene’).

The most exciting thing we found in developing this, was the cost and time in implementing such a solution. With the ability to consume data from Sketchup, ESRI 3D Models and even Google Earth models, we can reduce the time which a scene takes to build from weeks to mere hours, the most time consuming part is adding the links & getting the colours nice!! Have a look below at what we created:

[iframe src=”https://cloudciti.es/scenes/SJaI7ZBO/embed&#8221; width=”836″ height=”470″ frameborder=”0″ style=”border: 1px solid whitesmoke” webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe><p><a href=”https://cloudciti.es/SJaI7ZBO”>Wreck of the James Eagen Layne</a> from <a href=”https://cloudciti.es/users/54930bf17b2842080022f175″>Garsdale Design Limited</a> on <a href=”https://cloudcities.io”>CloudCities</a&gt;. ]

The model can be navigated in a similar manner to Google Earth, the model should also be interactive, with the ability to click on areas of the wreck with information returned on the right of the screen. If you look at the bottom left there are a set of icons which I will explain.

Overview of the buttons

Camera Button

 

The camera button, highlighted in green, provides access to the scene bookmarks, click on any of these and the scene will move to the view relating to the text. It will also alter the layers shown to provide the best view (according to the creator)

Animation button

The animation button, highlighted green above, animates the scene by cycling through the bookmarks

Layers buttonThe layers button allows access to the information relayed on the scene. By default, the tidal water is turned off and only one model is shown.

Light Simulation

The light simulation button provides ability to cast shadow and simulate specific times of day. Although not really relevant for an underwater feature, it provides a method for viewing internal features better.

Mobile User Bonus Feature!

For those of you using a mobile device, you will notice one further button:

Cardboard button

Yes, the scene is fully 3D and the viewer fully supports Google Cardboard, so go ahead and have a go!

Future development

This is just the beginning, as you can see this viewer is extremely lightweight and responsive Moving forward, we (Garsdale Design Ltd) are looking to adding further information such as nearby wrecks, more detailed bathymetry, objects which may cause risk such as anchorages and vessel movement in the area. The potential is immense and where this is geographic (hit the map button on the right) you can relate this to a real world location….in future versions we are looking to implementing Admiralty charts and bathymetry maps to view side by side with the site.

Disclaimer

I am not an archaeologist or diver! – Data is sourced from open data sources (Inspire, EA Lidar, Wikipedia) with the exception of the model(s) which were built by myself from images and multibeam data. Photos were obtained from Promare, on the Liberty 70 project – Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0, This data is not to be used for navigation or diving.

For further information or to ask how Garsdale Design can assist you, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Pokémon Go leads the AR Revolution

Originally posted on xyHt Magazine 12/7/2016

 

Six months ago when I claimed that augmented reality was the future of GIS and geospatial services and it was met with a few sniggers. This week has seen the arrival of Pokémon Go, one of the most popular games hit the mobile phone market….and yes, it is augmented reality and yes, it is geospatial. It could well be the turning point for many geospatial companies.

pokemongo

What is Pokémon Go?

In case you have been hidden in a cave fro the last 25yrs, Pokémon is a game that first appeared on the Nintendo Gameboy (circa 1995) in which players openly walk around the world and capture mystical creatures (in a white and red ball) which they then train to fight (other creatures) in battle arenas called “gyms”. If their creature (called a Pokémon but there are hundreds of breeds) wins their battle, then they earn a badge. The aim is to collect all the badges. Simple right?

Since the mid 90’s there have been 18 manga books, 19 films and about 17 games….yes, this thing is HUGE. Pokémon Go is the new generation and it was inevitable that it would become a geocaching game.

“Geocaching /ˈˌkæʃɪŋ/ is an outdoor recreational activity, in which participants use a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver or mobile device and other navigational techniques to hide and seek containers, called “geocaches” or “caches”, anywhere in the world.” – Wikipedia

Pokemon Encounter

Why Pokémonn Go is perfect for AR

Lets look at the concept of the game again, the user walks around the globe looking for Pokémon to capture and then train…..if this isn’t the definition of geocaching then I will eat my shorts (thanks Bart). Though any thoughts that this game was designed as a geocache promotion are quickly quelled when you realise that the first geocache was made around the millennium (by Dave Ulmer, Oregon).

For years we have struggled to get our children interested in mapping and geography not realising that this was sat under our nose the whole time! I ironically, it is all due to an Aprils Fools Day joke in 2014 in which it was claimed that Google had developed an augmented reality app…..Niantic saw that this could be a reality and worked with Google, the rest is history.

How does it work?

After logging into the app for the first time, the player creates their avatar. The player can choose the avatar’s style, hair, skin, and eye color, and can choose from a limited number of outfits. Once the avatar is created, it is displayed at the player’s current location along with a map of the player’s immediate surroundings. Features on the map may include a number of landmarks where Pokémon may be and Pokémon gyms (places where you battle your Pokémon).

As players travel the real world, the avatar moves along the game’s map. Different Pokémon live in different areas of the world; for example, water-type Pokémon are generally found near water. When a player encounters a Pokémon, they may view it either in augmented reality mode or with a pre-rendered background. AR mode uses the camera and gyroscope on the player’s mobile device to display an image of a Pokémon as though it were in the real world. Players can also take pictures, using an in-game camera, of the Pokémon that they encounter both with and without the AR mode activated.

There is a fantastic article on how Google chose the locations for the Pokémon/geocaches here (by Mashable) whereby it explains how safety was the primary concern. Caches were chosen based on open places that had some significance so that players wouldn’t be chasing a Pikachu (a type of Pokémon) across a train track.

Pokemon Batlle

Why will it change geo things?

Already there is a wave of companies looking at how they can use marketing to get a piece of the pie, see this & this, it is evident that people are aware that this is, excuse the pun, a game changer. It really isn’t hard to see that this is going to be popular….so this might well be the turning point for geospatial, AR & VR. If people are comfortable using AR through this game then they will start expecting it for their mapping, bringing back apps like LAYAR which augmented real world information.

AR on Mobile

The applications are immense and exciting for the geospatial industry, the ability to overlay real world issues and information to what the user sees through the camera would be the definitive mapping system. Even if the accuracy isn’t that amazing (mobile GPS – think about it) there is the potential to use clever imagery and presentation to overcome most issues. Imagine sending the worst member of your team to site, with an AR map you could be 90% sure that they would be able to find the correct building over using a 2D map, or think about how easy it could be to identify potential points of weakness or contamination around a site by just looking through your device, all set by someone sat at a desk on the other side of the world.

Of course this is speculation but consider the rise of VR which is now around us, soon we will all be fully immersed watching TV, playing games and riding roller coasters, 3D GIS has seen a rise over the last few years too, with many geospatial providers offering 3D add-ons or 3D alternatives. Furthermore the conferences were rife with talk and demonstration of 3D and VR. Of course all this innovation is led by CEOs and Project Managers who have seen their kid playing with some game and asking that all important question….

“Why can’t our company do that?”

You’d be a fool to think that this is all going to just disappear, the future of geospatial is now, we are seeing the evolution occur in front of our eyes – Just like the late Roger Tomlinson evolved the paper map to digital GIS in the 60’s, we are seeing 2D moving to 3D real world. I am all for it, it will bring new challenges, better accuracy and more interaction with the user…..though I draw the line at Pokemon Go myself.

Dragons8mycat

Do your work right and you can be smart too

Originally published in xyHt

Ever since I saw the word phrase “smart city”, I have cringed. Not because of the term but what it alludes to. To me it says that we (geospatial experts) haven’t done our work right….let me explain

From Wikipedia:

“A smart city is an urban development vision to integrate multiple information and communication technology (ICT) solutions in a secure fashion to manage a city’s assets”

Now, my understanding, as a person who uses a GIS on a daily basis, was that a GIS was used to overlay and integrate multiple layers of information to gain insight and manage a project more efficiently….so, in reality, these two aren’t too dissimilar. In fact, when you look into it further, the [smart] platform is pretty much a GIS which links to live data and data which is structured to be interlinked [each data is linked to all the other data]…oh, of course, there is some form of asset management, usually in the form of a CMS [Content Management System].

Smart_City_GraphI guess my point is that I’m frustrated that many of us, geospatial experts, aren’t being “smart” with our data and hands up, at times I can be one of you. I download a load of data, put it in my geodatabase and don’t think twice about it until someone asks for it.

Here is a great example – I was working on site analysis of wind farms and pretty much the job involved loading in all the environmental constraints, physical and topographical constraints, overlaying them and finding gaps. The way it has been done for generations. Except I woke up one day and thought, “why am I doing this?”….and I looked at the data I was using and started to build a model (in ESRI modelbuilder) and what the model did was take all the files, spatial joined them (merging them with their attributes in tact) and then doing a few tasks to turn the gaps in the data into polygons. I then made a centroid from the polygons and THEN did another spatial join on the data using the nearby setting.

What I ended up with was a fully automated way to find the best sites for a wind farm and also report back (in spreadsheet) what the nearest constraints were. Over time I found there were other data I could build into it, like land use, Land Registry land type (freehold/leasehold) and even some analysis to provide slope, average sun, aspect. Yes, 3 years ago I was working “smart”….unfortunately too smart for the company as this new-fangled technology wasn’t as good as having somebody rummage through by hand to find the best locations (even though the best sites were the ones the computer picked!).

Let’s have a look at the principle behind this :

Knowing that we were trying to find areas suitable for wind farms, the area needs to be unbuilt land, have not within 250m of  a building, it shouldn’t be closer than 40km from an airport (though it could be), it shouldn’t be on anywhere too steep or next to an existing wind farm. Obviously it shouldn’t be in any of the environmentally sensitive areas.

Most of the data is open data –

Environmental constraints: Natural England

Wind farms: The Crown Estate and Restats

Land Registry land type: Land Registry

Land Use (rough):

Topography (buildings, terrain): Ordnance Survey vectormap, Strategi & Open Map

And (curiously enough) farms, restaurants, business parks and other points of interest were taken from my SatNav (extracted as a csv)

The model would then look a little like this:

WindFarm_Flowchart

But there are other ways to be smart

The former method uses a spatial join technique whereby features which lie in the same location are combined into a large dataset which can be interrogated. Another technique is to join tables of related information to enhance the data about location, this is quite commonly used in demographics but can be used anywhere.

A great example of this would be the neighbourhood statistics websites whereby they provide information about your locality…let’s have a look at how this can be done with openly available data:

If we download the Super Output Areas (average population approx 1000) from National Statistics, we can then join most of their data based on Super Output Area [SOA] ID

SOA_types
Output area types
ONS_Join
By joining the area code to the area code in the table we can extract informative data

As you can see, this can be used to create much more informative data, some software vendors might even call it “enriched” data and it is extremely easy to do.

….and then you realise that you can THEN spatially join this data to buildings, political boundaries, offices and all other types of data to extract SMART data about the locations.

My challenge to you today is to “enrich” the next data you use, if only for your own satisfaction, add some demographic data to it, add some wikipedia data to it, spatially join it with the INSPIRE Land Registry polygons (while you can)….go on, do it……that sense of satisfaction, THAT is why you do GIS.

 

Nick D

 

QGIS 2.5D AGAIN….But on a web map!

You can now export your QGIS 2.5D maps straight to a web map thanks to the genius(es) Tom Chadwin & Luca Casagrande who developed the QGIS2Web plugin. Before I run away with myself and start talking 2.5D and cool effects, I think it’s best I clarify a few things.

No, you didn’t misread that, you can now export your QGIS 2.5D maps straight to a web map thanks to the genius(es) Tom Chadwin & Luca Casagrande who developed the QGIS2Web plugin. Before I run away with myself and start talking 2.5D and cool effects, I think it’s best I clarify a few things.

Firstly, I realise that I told a bit of a fib when I wrote the xyHt article on web mapping where I said that there wasn’t an easier way to build a web map. There is, it is QGIS2Web, the only thing you need is your own website and QGIS. You simply make your map and hit the plugin button….voila! Not only a preview of the web map but also options for measure, popups, scalebar and even basemaps – It is truly a thing of beauty. The only technical knowledge you need is how to copy and paste your folder onto your web host.

It sounds too good to be true, which is why I feel guilty for ignoring it for so long….Having been beaten by the geospatial industry for well over a decade, I naturally assumed it was some scam whereby I would have to buy into something or pay for a subscription but no, this is the real deal. This is what ArcGIS online should have been, you front the cost (or not – have another look at Github pages *ahem*) for your website and the rest is free. You can host as many maps as you want with whatever style and data….of course, with a little know how and you can even link them to other sources using hyperlinks in your fields.

Screenshot from the 2.5D map I made
Screenshot from the 2.5D map I made

So, let’s clarify what 2.5D is

2D is the everyday “flat” maps which you would generate in QGIS/ArcGIS/MapInfo/CadCorp (add your own here) although there is relation of how features lie in comparison to others, there is no depth. Buildings and trees appear as “top-down” flat objects.

In true Dragons8mycat style, the best way to describe this is using a 2D image of Super Mario Bros:

Super Mario Brothers in 2D
Super Mario Brothers in 2D

2.5D Adds depth, though it is not full 3D, it cannot be explored like Google Earth, rather it is an illusion of depth.

This can be seen in the image below of Mario in 2.5D

2.5D Super Mario Bros
2.5D Super Mario Bros

3D provides true depth and the ability to explore the depth, this would be the Google Earth buildings or the CityEngine webscenes. Unlike a fixed view of the 3D features, they allow full movement around the real-world feature. Here is Super Mario once again to show what 3D is:

Super Mario in all three dimensions
Super Mario in all three dimensions

Is this the right time to discuss 4D?….No?….Briefly then – 4D is the medium of time, if we were to add a timeslider to the 3D Super Mario above, and  we could move around not only the features but also the time, then it would be 4D (temporal).

Out of interest I have had many discussions over what 3.5D is and so far the general consensus is that it would be a 2.5D map with temporal capability, so think of a 2.5D map which showed change over time….could this (below) be 3.5D?

3.5D?
3.5D?

Back to the future (qgis2web)

The QGIS2Web plugin provides the ability to create 2.5D features on a web map, there is the option to adjust & change colour and you can add functionality. What really surprised me was how easy it was.

Of course there are some minor things which I found as I worked through but I am sure that these will be fixed before this post goes live as the developers of this plugin are right on the ball.

Tip 1 – Use geojson files.

Although the Plugin uses any QGIS data (WYSIWYG) I found the plugin quicker and gave a more accurate representation with geojson files

Tip 2 – Forget your shadows

I was told that the plugin DOES honour the shadow effects but I found in my experience that the shapeburst fills and shadow effects didn’t work and in some cases caused the map to hang when switched on

Tip 3 – You need to remove the OSM maps in the code.

There are a plethora of basmaps available, I’m not going to knock it, BUT there is no option to turn them all off or to have them off by default. If you want to remove them, find the layers.js file and then remove the baselayers reference. var layersList = [baselayers,lyr_LandParcelsSedbergh,lyr_Trees]; should be changed to var layersList = [lyr_LandParcelsSedbergh,lyr_Trees];

 

[iframe src=”http://dragons8mycat.net/QGIS2WEB/sedbergh2D/&#8221; width=”600″ height=”400″ scrolling=”yes” ]

 

Above is the map I made of Sedbergh, as you can see, the OSM baselayer is still on as I keep going through phases of liking it and then hating it.

I am sure you will agree that, once the shadowing and shapeburst fills work, it will be amazing.

If you need any further information or would like some training, please feel free to contact me.

Nick D

 

QGIS 2.5D Functionality

I originally posted this on xyHt on 16th Feb 2016

 

I had, when I went into the office today, to do an amazing blog about the QGIS 2.5D functionality and how it was the beginning of QGIS’ journey into the 3rd dimension.

Only I can’t, Anita Graser, the author of “Learning QGIS 2.0” and owner of the “Free and open source ramblings” blog beat me to it. I was not only beaten but she went and added a temporal element to it all….I can’t be upset, I have a lot of time and respect for Anita. In this case it worked in my favour, my competitiveness came out and I sat and thought of just how I was going to do something better.

First let’s discuss the “2.5” functionality, why haven’t you seen it & why is it gaining publicity?

The 2.5D rendering is a new function added to the styling options in QGIS 2.14 which will be released [approx] 25th March. This is available now, primarily for testing purposes through the QGIS 2.13 development release on OSGEO, so what you are reading might change further before release.

Last year Matthias Kuhn set up a crowdfunding campaign to provide oblique 3D rendering as an option to the QGIS output but most importantly enable a way to print/output the result as many of the plugins available in QGIS are just visualisation tools. Little did Matthias realise how popular this idea was and it was funded by November 30th 2015. 

 

“This project aims to improve the internal possibilities of QGIS to give an oblique view 3D effect based on a height attribute and an angle while fully preserving all the possibilities which the QGIS styling offers. But it doesn’t stop there, the whole rendering is built in a modular way so you can use all of its parts for countless other possibilities.”

 

As stated earlier, it is still in a development test phase but being QGIS it is still very stable….oh yes, it is a fully functional death star. Let’s look at the process for using this function:

Buildings without the 2.5D effect applied
Buildings without the 2.5D effect applied
The standard interface we are all used to
The standard interface we are all used to
A look in the dropdown shows a new function - 2.5D rendering!
A look in the dropdown shows a new function – 2.5D rendering!
New options!
New options!

As you can see, there is a new interface and options when you select the 2.5D option. Height of the “effect” is based on either a field in the attribution or a z (height) geometry. In this case [1] it is based on a field which I had to create based on the geometry called “z_rel” (short for relative z).

Now here is something interesting – I was using 3D data, in fact I was using 3D geospatial shapefiles in ArcGIS filegdb format with roof detail and even windows BUT it wouldn’t work. Not because of anything major but because the plugin only supports simple extrusion, or simple z geometry (meaning no multipatch!). Once the z values for the buildings were extracted to a field and the footprints extracted from the multipatch data, the result was good, as you may see below:

The end result of using 2.5D with the buildings
The end result of using 2.5D with the buildings

We can add a little more detail by using trees. I first tried using the 2.5D render to display the trees and found that it would provide an “extrude effect” down the side of the tree:

You can see the extrude effect on the side of the trees
You can see the extrude effect on the side of the trees
Trying to mask the effect
Trying to mask the effect

 

Final attempt with just shadow on the tree canopies
Final attempt with just shadow on the tree canopies

Above you can see in the 2 images side by side that the trees look too heavy, whereas by taking the tree canopy and applying a simple shadow, it is easy to make the trees come to life. Note that there is no option to remove the extrusion effect or side of the isometric option (referred to as the wall color) – if this was possible I believe a fairly realistic effect could be created as you could base the 2.5D on the height of the canopy and then add another vector data to simulate a trunk (or not if it looks bad).

 

From a cartographic point of view, I think this effect works well and with a little adjustment and refinement we could create some magical maps..my only question is that when we are trying to simulate 3D, why don’t we just draw 3D? After all, using exactly the same data I created the below using QGIS2Threejs, you can play with it yourself here (be warned that due to the amount of data it is a little slow)

Using the same data
Using the same data

One thing is for sure, I will be watching this closely and seeing what develops, I suggest you do the same!

Nick D

Dragon_in_Nature

New Job, New Goals, same Dragons8mycat

In case you aren’t on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Slack, YouTube, Instagram or Geonet (don’t laugh I hear there are users) I decided that I needed a new challenge and to get behind a winning team.

There are many areas of the geospatial world that interest me, I am a huge fan hydrography and positional accuracy, though there is one area which I feel is getting under-represented…..3D. As I have stated before, we see, live and interact within a 3D world, in fact this year is set to be the year of the VR (Virtual Reality Headset) with sales estimated to be over $1bn. Having seen some of their work and hearing some of their plans, there was only one choice – Garsdale Design Ltd.

wedo3DGIS

Garsdale Design struck a chord with me, they were REALLY eager to point out that a visualisation wasn’t just a simple thing to look at any more. The conversations we always had were around the concept of 3D GIS, where the visualisation ends and the real analysis begins, more on this in another blog, but think to yourself….what defines GIS?

3DGISExample

Although it is early days, one of my drivers for Garsdale Design is to not only put 3D GIS on the map (apologies for the pun) but to be able to provide it in both proprietary and open source formats, providing platforms for all users to build and develop, create tools and have a product which we all have wanted.

Let’s be honest, ArcScene came close, though was too quirky, QGIS2ThreeJs is good but misses options for modelling larger areas….I could go on, but the future is ESRI CityEngine, Cesium & QGIS, no I’m not mad and no, I haven’t sold out either. CityEngine is by far the best tool for 3DGIS at the moment but Cesium is gaining ground with an open platform which could be developed to serve measuring and analysis tools. Then we get to QGIS who are developing things which most GIS users could have only dreamed of 5yrs ago….and are now talking 3D, can you imagine the possibilities?

As with all things, a week into the job and there are many, many more plans which are super exciting which I am forced to keep silent about, I am really glad I made the move.

 

2016-01-15 12.10.22

So, here we are, the dream team, I am the one with the Parka, note that the fells are covered in snow, I am not yet acclimatised and able to go sans jacket like these crazy northern UK people.

Parka or not, Garsdale Design now has a full suite of GIS services as well as 3D GIS services such as;

Geospatial Data Management & Processing
Asset Management
Cartographic Representation
Web Mapping – Mapserver/Open Layers/PostGIS
Constraints Mapping
Site Selection through Multi-criteria
Evaluation
GIS Model Production/Training
Spatial Analysis
Least Cost Path Analysis
Site Design & Layout
Design Refinement/Micrositing
Zone of Theoretical Visibility (ZTV)
3D Urban & Site Modelling
Geospatial Data Standards and implimentation
Metadata Standards and implimentation
Geodatabase modelling
Geoprocess modelling
Ordnance Survey data structure and implimentation
Data distribution and implimentation, providing map sharing solutions
Interactive geospatial solutions
Automatic Identification Systems (AIS)

Feel free to contact me if you need help or training on any of the above!

Be rest assured that my blogs will continue as they always have, though from time to time I may well discuss 3D GIS a little more, watch this space….

Dragons8mycat